Dental Procedures And Medication During Pregnancy

Aug 29, 2014 @ 09:45 AM — by Kevin Growney, DDS | Comments (0)
Tagged with: Pregnant Medication |

Two out of every three women take prescriptions during their pregnancies. However, due to misunderstandings and misinformation, many woman have anxiety about dental treatment and taking medications dental related while pregnant. There is actually a small variety of drugs prescribed by dentists which makes it easy to break down what is safe and not safe. The degree of safety to the baby is then measured against the potential benefit to the expecting mother.

 

Drug Risk Factor Categories

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has five risk factor categories for drugs:

A- Studies fail to demonstrate a risk to the fetus; possibility of fetal harm is remote.

B- Only negative animal studies and NO human studies exist or positive animal studies exist with human studies not confirming those animal studies

C- Positive animal studies and NO human studies or results of a study are not available

D- Positive evidence of fetal risk but the benefits make the risks acceptable.

X- Studies show fetal abnormalities and those risks severely outweigh the benefit to the mother

 

Drug Categories A, B, C & D

Drugs in category A or B are considered safe to use during pregnancy. Category C is safe as long as the benefits outweigh the risks. Category D should be avoided if possible, and its almost always possible. Category X is strictly prohibited.

 

5 Drugs Dentist Will Prescribe To Pregnant Women

There are five main types of drugs a dentist will prescribe to a pregnant woman: analgesics and anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, anesthetics (local and topical), sedatives and emergency medications. Before discussing each category, however, it is important first to determine how to weigh whether or not the risks outweigh the benefits.

 

Risks/Benefits

The first consideration is whether the expected benefits to the mother are greater than any potential risks to the fetus. The risk/benefit is determined by which of the above categories the drug falls into. Also, expecting mothers want to avoid anything in the first trimester. There is a wide variety of drugs available for each particular need and those with the most extensive use should be chosen, rather than new drugs that may not be tested yet. It is important to recognize that the absence of data does not imply safety. And finally, always use the minimum dose required to treat the expecting mother.

AGENT                                        

FDA Pregnancy Category

Safe During Pregnancy?

ANALGESICS AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY

Acetaminophen

Aspirin

Codeine

Glucocorticoids

Hydrocodone

Ibuprofen

Oxycodone

 

B

C/D

C

C

C

C/D

B

 

Yes

Avoid

Use with caution

Avoid

Use with caution

Not in 3rd Trimester

Use with caution

ANTIBIOTICS

Amoxicillin

Azithromycin

Cephalexin

Chlorhexidine Rinse

Clarithromycin

Clindamycin

Clotrimazole

Doxycycline

Erythromycin

Flucomazole

Metronidazole

Nystatin

Penicillin

Tetracycline

 

B

B

B

B

C

B

B

D

B

C/D

B

C

B

D

 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Use with caution

Yes

Yes

Avoid

Yes

Yes (single dose)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Avoid

LOCAL ANESTHETICS

Articaine

Bupivacaine

Lidocaine

Mepivacaine

Prilocaine

Benzocaine (topical)

Tetracaine (topical)

Lidocaine (topical)

 

C

C

B

C

B

C

C

B

 

Use with caution

Use with caution

Yes

Use with caution

Yes

Use with caution 

Use with caution

Yes

SEDATIVES

Benzodiazepines

Zaleplon

Zolpidem

 

D/X

C

C

 

Avoid

Use with caution

Use with caution

EMERGENCY MEDICATIONS

Albuterol

Diphenhydramine

Epinephrine

Flumazenil

Naloxone

Nitroglycerin

 

C

B

C

C

C

C

 

Yes

Yes

Use with caution

Use with caution

Use with caution

Use with caution

 

 

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